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Charles Baraw

baraw
Associate Professor of English

Office: Engleman Hall D274
Phone: 203.392.6733

Email:  barawc1@southernct.edu 

 

 


Education

Ph.D., English Literature, Yale University, 2000
M.A., English, Middlebury College, 1993 
B.A., English and American History, University of Vermont, 1978

About Professor baraw

Charles Baraw writes and teaches about American literature from the captivity narrative of Mary Rowlandson to the contemporary poetry of Susan Howe. He is interested in genre and narrative theory, in the histories of authorship and reading, and in the theory and practice of close reading. [Current research touristic poetics] Recent courses include American Literature through History, American Realism, The Modern and Contemporary Novel, and Modern and Contemporary Poetry. He also teaches the core courses for the Literature Concentration: ENG 307 and ENG 308 and a popular LEP Tier II W Course. “Comics and the American Experience,” which examines social issues in American history.In addition to graduate courses on 19th-century and Contemporary American literature, he has developed a new course, bringing together works from the seventeenth-century to the present: “Experimental American Literature: Afterlives of the Archive.” Recent publications range from the pedagogy of comics and Animal Studies to work on the poetics of tourism and nineteenth-century literary form. Professor Baraw is also actively involved in developing the transatlantic partnership with the English Department at Liverpool John Moores University.  

Recent Courses tAUGHT 

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONs

“Can We Be Part of the Pride? Reading Animals through Comics in the Undergraduate Classroom," co-authored with Prof. Andrew Smyth, SCSU, in Animal Comics: Multispecies Storyworlds in Graphic Narratives (2017), edited by David Herman. 

"Hawthorn, Salem, and the Poetics of Literary Tourism," Canadian Review of American Studies, April 2017. 

"Hawthorn as Transatlantic Tour Guide in 'The Old Manse' and Beyond" in Transatlantic Literature and Author Love in the Nineteenth Century (2016), edited by Paul Westover and Ann Rowland.

"Hawthorn's Two Bodies: Poetics and Aesthetics in Our Old Home," Literary Imagination, July 2016. 

"William Wells Brown, Three Years in Europe and Fugitive Tourism," The African American Review (Fall 2011.) Winner of the David T. Turner Award for the "Best Essay of the Year."