major in geography

 Liberal Arts and Secondary Education Programs

 campus shotThis major in geography develops a mastery of basic systematic and regional concepts. A student is prepared either for more specialized graduate work or for entry into business, education, government, and industry. This specialization consists of 30 credits.

Geography 200, 201, 270, 371 and one regional course are required of all majors. Geography 100 and Geography 102 may be taken to satisfy a general education requirement or as free electives but do not count toward the major. Geography 490 is required for all majors in the B.A. degree program. The remaining four courses are to be selected from among
the systematic and regional courses listed below:

 

Systematic Courses

GEO 205 - Economic Geography I
GEO 206 - Economic Geography II
GEO 208 - Political Geography
GEO 260 - Population Geography
GEO 265 - Recreation Geography
GEO 273 - Land Use Planning
GEO 298 - Special Topics
GEO 301 - Landforms
GEO 302 - World Climates
GEO 362 - Urban Geography
GEO 370 - Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation
GEO 372 - Cartography II
GEO 373 - Cartography III
GEO 398 - Special Topics
GEO 437 - The Law of the Sea
GEO 460 - Geographic Information Systems
GEO 461 - Geographic Information Systems II
GEO 470 - Field Techniques
GEO 480 - Computer Applications in Geography
GEO 494 - Geography for Teachers
GEO 497 - Internship
GEO 498 - Special Topics in Geography


Regional Courses

GEO 311 - United States and Canada
GEO 315 - Connecticut
GEO 325 - Latin America
GEO 330 - Europe
GEO 341 - Asia
GEO 342 - Middle East
GEO 343 - Former Soviet Union
GEO 344 - Central Asia
GEO 345 - Africa
GEO 357 - Marine Geography

Geography secondary education majors receive teaching
certification in history and the social sciences. Certification
in history and the social sciences requires 18 credits in history
beyond the University Requirements including at least
one course in non-western history, and at least one course
in each of the following areas: economics; political science,
psychology and sociology, or anthropology.

Students in this program must also complete specific professional
requirements for Initial Teaching Certification in Connecticut.
These are listed under the heading Major Programs
in Secondary Education in the School of Education.

 

Bachelor of Science with a Specialization in Planning

This specialization develops the requisite competencies for
an entry-level career appointment by governmental agencies
and private companies in the areas of planning, mapping, and
related activities at the local, state, and federal levels.


Regional Courses

GEO 200 - Human Geography
GEO 201 - Physical Geography
GEO 270 - Maps and Map Interpretation
GEO 273 - Land Use Planning
GEO 362 - Urban Geography
GEO 371 - Cartography I
GEO 372 - Cartography II
GEO 497 - Internship

One Regional course (from the Regional Course list)

One elective from the following:
GEO 205 - Economic Geography I
GEO 206 - Economic Geography II
GEO 208 - Political Geography
GEO 260 - Population Geography
GEO 265 - Recreation Geography
GEO 298 - Special Topics
GEO 301 - Landforms
GEO 302 - World Climates
GEO 357 - Marine Geography
GEO 370 - Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation
GEO 373 - Cartography III
GEO 437 - The Law of the Sea
GEO 460 - Geographic Information Systems
GEO 461 - Geographic Information Systems II
GEO 470 - Field Techniques
GEO 480 - Computer Applications in Geography
GEO 490 - Seminar in Geographic Thought
GEO 494 - Geography for Teachers

Cognate Area
All students must either establish competence in mathematics
at the Calculus II level (Mathematics 151) or complete a
four-course sequence in a cognate area approved by the Geography
Department (e.g., Environmental Studies 300, 301,
400, 491). The student satisfies the remaining requirements
for cognate area study by taking one course in statistics, 6-9
credits in computer science, and an internship.

 

Learning Objectives

Spatial thinking and understanding

Students should be geographically informed and see meaning in the arrangement of things in space; see relations between people, places, natural systems and environments; use geographic skills; and apply spatial and ecological perspectives to life-situations.

 

Globalization
Students should develop an understanding of and awareness for at least one world region, the challenges that confront it, and its role in the global context. They should appreciate and apply a regional approach in order to situate a region within the context of a complex world. The student will be expected to construct and represent an understanding of world regions based on the range of scale from the self to the earth.

 

Human-Environment Interactions

Students should be able to assess human/societal phenomena and current events in terms of their interaction with-and impacts on-the environment/natural systems, especially considering current debates concerning sustainability. Students should be able to place these concepts in a multi-scalar framework.

 

Methods 

Students should understand the conceptual foundations of and computational benefits of using geographic information systems (GIS). They will understand important caveats to visualizing spatial data. Students will know how to design research that takes advantage of their knowledge of GIS and quantitative analysis of spatial relationships and patterns. They will gain proficiency in collecting geographical data in the field and from secondary sources and know when both are appropriate.