CAMPY

MORNING SESSIONS
AFTERNOON SESSIONS

CAMPY on Campus, at Southern Connecticut State University
MORNING SESSIONS 9:00-11:30
  May 15, 2012

Morning
Session
#

 

Presenter

 

Title of Presentation

 

Description
 
 

1.
 
 
 
 
 

Professor Elizabeth Fiorillo
Southern Connecticut State University

EN A 120

How dense are we?

Students will discuss and examine the population of CT, US and the world... Students will take a look at population density with respect to CT and the rest of the world.

2.




 

Marsha Davis
Eastern Connecticut State University

EN A 117

I Missed You Nearly!

Car stunts must be very carefully planned or the stunt men and women performing them could lose their lives. In this session teams will design one or more stunts. For at least one of the stunts, teams will test their designs using battery-operated toys. Calculator Based Rangers (CBRs) and graphing caluclators wil be used to gather information about a variety of motions including the motions of battery operated toys.

3.




 

Dr. Louise Grober - Yale University
&
Dr. Christine Broadbridge - Southern CT State University

EN A 105

"Nanoscience and Technology: the science of things small"

Students will do a series of hands on Nanoscience experiments that explore how super small things behave differently. Tour the Nanocharacterization Laboratory, check out a Scanning Electron Microscope and see how Nanoscientist explore the Nanoworld.

4.





 

Dr. Joe Fields
Southern Connecticut State University

EN A 113

A workshop on Cryptography!

Cryptopgraphy is the study of "secret writing." This is the only branch of mathematics to be designated by the U.S. government as export-controlled. Cryptographic knowledge is considered to be "war materials!" While we won't head off into TOP SECRET territory we will have a bit of fun working out how to make (and to break) good secret codes.

5.





 

Steve Lecky
Mathematics Teacher
EN A 109

Programming for a Purpose: Drawing conclusions about fruit flies and aliens

Have you ever wondered how to write a program to perform a task on a computer or calculator? Or, maybe you've wondered how programming can be used in the real world for something other than gaming. In this workshop, we will learn some beginning programming code. Then, we will write programs and use them to gain a better understanding of the world around us (and beyond!). If we have time, we might even relate our investigations to geometry. If you have a TI-83 or TI-84 calculator, or if you can borrow one from your school, please bring it. If not, TI-84s will be provided for the workshop.

CAMPY on Campus, at Southern Connecticut State University
AFTERNOON SESSIONS 12:00-2:30
May 15, 2012

Afternoon
Session #
 

Presenter
  
 

Title of Presentation

 

Description
  
 

6.
 
 
 
 
 

Dr. Marie El Nabbout - Southern CT State University

EN A 109

How tall is that tree?

In this session, students will learn how to measure the height of a tree model in a problem-based setting. Students will model the problem, investigate different methods and learn how geometry can help to solve this question. Students will later apply what they had learned and determine the heights of real trees in an outdoor setting.

7.





 

Dr. Klay Kruczek
Southern Connecticut State University

EN A 113

Birds, Trees, and Tic-Tac-Toe!

We will learn about the pigeonhole principle, the cheapest way to construct roads to connect cities, and Tic-Tac-Toe. We will extend our basic knowledge of Tic-Tac-Toe, including the size of a winning line and the number of dimensions.

8.




 

Adam Goldberg

Southern Connecticut State University

EN B 221

Exciting Activities with Excel

 

Students will be in a computer lab using Microsoft Excel. We will explore mathematics and science activities using the computer.

9.





 

Ingrid Elinger-Doviak

Southern Connecticut State University

EN A 117

Problem Solving creatively!

In this session, participants will practice strategies that they can use effectively to prompt the math thinking orally, in drawing, and in writing. Hands-on math "thinking" games and challenges will be posed throughout the presentation.

10.







 

Dr. Joe Fields
Southern Connecticut State University

EN A 120

A workshop on Cryptography!

Cryptopgraphy is the study of "secret writing." This is the only branch of mathematics to be designated by the U.S. government as export-controlled. Cryptographic knowledge is considered to be "war materials!" While we won't head off into TOP SECRET territory we will have a bit of fun working out how to make (and to break) good secret codes.

Use this link to Register CAMPY 2012 for CAMPY Sessions